Paparazzoo - Paparazzoo Prototype Parade

Paparazzoo Prototype Parade

16 Aug, 2017

In today’s blog post, we’ll share with you how the idea for Paparazzoo evolved from a very basic thought through several prototypes (some of which involving Lego) into the game that it is now.

At first, the zoo was simply a grid drawn on paper with 21 different Lego components (and some paper) representing the animals. A simple one-way street mechanism was already part of this very first design, but Kembe was not!

 

Soon we introduced Kembe (then called Bokito after a gorilla that famously escaped a Dutch zoo). Admittedly, you need some imagination to see a gorilla in this grey and black construct.

The next step was to change the layout of the board, as the grid caused people to get stuck in corners. A circular layout makes sure that the other side of the board is never too far away.


 

To make things a bit more realistic, we created 3D printed Kembe miniatures (that we were very proud of). Also, we ordered meeples and wooden animals in many colors.


To make things a bit more realistic, we created 3D printed Kembe miniatures (that we were very proud of). Also, we ordered meeples and wooden animals in many colors.

The new pieces looked great on the board. Together with some action cards, this actually started to look like a game! Of course, the board still needed a facelift.

Much better!

 

Trying new things

Time to explore some variations. Since we weren’t too happy with the one-way streets, we tried alternative mechanisms to restrict players’ movements, such as these rotating special intersections.

 

What you see below is a completely different way of playing the same game. Instead of taking an animal (tile) from the board, you add a token in your color to the board. This has the advantage of seeing directly who have covered which areas. It also speeds up final scoring. However, we felt that these benefits still didn’t justify the loss of the very aspect of ‘collecting photos’.

 

Quite late in the iteration process, we started exploring the advantages of using cardboard tokens instead of wooden animals. What you see here is just an initial impression of the idea, but it looked very promising to us. Cardboard tokens can result in a much better looking game, while reducing production cost.


 

The final prototype

Here’s the final prototype! You can see the cardboard tokens with some initial art (thanks, Google!). Also, the final mechanism for one-way direction at intersections was implemented here. And in the top section of the photo, you can see the revised player boards that now look like photo albums. All core components were finalized at this point: all changes after this prototype are purely cosmetic.